NYC – Rockefeller Center – Art Deco

A visit to Rockefeller Center––a city within a city––is a must. New York’s most important urban complex of the twentieth century, the Center was built between 1931 and 1939. Rockefeller Center extends from 48th to 51st Street, and from Fifth to Sixth Avenue.

The promenade separating the British and French buildings

The Fifth Avenue frontage is a show case for the cause of international understanding–hence the International Building, the Maison Française, the British Empire Building, the Palazzo d’Italia––and the Channel Gardens (named for the English Channel separating France and England), between the French and British buildings, lined with fall foliage and statuary

Seeds of Good Citizenship
Above Channel Gardens Entrance of La Maison Francaise
Winged Mercury -Above Channel Gardens Entrance of 620 Fifth Avenue

Rockefeller Center epitomizes the Machine Age––building materials like aluminum and stainless steel, parking facilities for cars and trucks, high speed elevators, air cooling, noise silencers and escalators. There is so much to see both inside and outside but I thought it would be nice to feature a few of the works that are on the outside of the buildings.

I placed the street location or reference point on each photo.

PROGRESS
Above 49th Street entrance.
CORNUCOPIA OF PLENTY
10 West 51st Street
THE JOY OF LIFE
Above 48th Street entrance

What is Art Deco?

Although the question seems simple, historians have not been able to agree upon a single, definitive answer. The time period, aesthetic principles, motifs, and just about everything else that typically defines a style or movement, are all open to interpretation when it comes to defining Art Deco.

NEWS
Above 50 Rockefeller Plaza main entrance.
SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI WITH BIRDS
Above 9 West 50th Street entrance of 630 Fifth Avenue

I thought I would include something you might miss when going to or walking past Radio City Music Hall.

Dance, Drama, and Song

These three large stylized decorative plaques, placed high up on the south façade of Radio City Music Hall.

Two of the six playful plaques under the marquee at the front entrance.

A couple of observations as of this publication date.

  • Overall, New York City is less crowded.
  • Check ahead to see if places you want to visit will be open.
  • Public bathrooms are even fewer that usual.
  • There is a bathroom in the main building at Rockefeller center.

NYC – Backup Plan for Rainy Day

NYC – Rain makes for sudden changes

Recently, I went to see a parade –IMMIGRANT’S PARADE  – but unfortunately when I got there it started to rain. I mean really rain!

Click photos to enlarge

So you are soaking wet and the parade gets cancelled, what to do?

Think inside. Before I went to the parade I looked up where the parade was to be held and also what other sites are nearby. I guess it is called having a backup plan.

The following is a record of my afternoon:

I arrived at the parade and found many participants seeking cover. I walked over by the Radio City Hall and realized that the parade was not going to hap

First, I headed into Rockefeller Center (nice and dry) walked underneath from 6th Avenue to Seventh Avenue. Sat for awhile had a coffee and used their bathroom.

I had read that an old Art Store had been converted into a cooperative for artists and headed in that direction.The cooperative had just opened and had only a few artisans manning their displays.

 

The rain kept coming so I ducked into the Sheraton Hotel . Hotel lobbies are great places to sit and rex and, if needed, use their public bathroom.

Rain continues so I am off to the Time Warner Building at Columbus Circle. Passing the Columbus Circle Subway entrance, I was intrigued by the colorful sign advertising 39 stores below in the subway lobby.

So, below I went Great use of this space and very unique shops and dry.

I decided to head for home.

Moral: No matter what the weather, go and explore!