NYC – 2020 – Chinese New Year – Firecrackers – Parade

Chinatown is one of the most famous neighborhoods in downtown Manhattan and hands down holds two of the best events of the the Chinese New Year celebration.


For two weeks, starting on January 25, you can head to Manhattan’s Chinatown for the Firecracker Ceremony and later, on February 9th, the Chinese New Year Parade.

 

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Thousands of these are sold, almost everyone of them is used on the streets.
During the Firecracker Celebration the streets get covered in confetti, people dress in red and gold with beautifully painted faces or masks, and the sounds of drums and bells and huge dragons are everywhere. This is what Chinese New Year looks like in New York. The celebration of this holiday is both visually and atmospherically impressive. The street parties with vendors selling great Chinese food, different performances, music, firecrackers, and entertainment for all ages last for almost two weeks.
 

 the sparkly explosives are set off to ward off bad spirits for 2020.

Here are some highlights.

The Chinese New Year Parade and Festival takes place on a different day than the Firecracker Festival. This year it will be celebrated on Sunday, February 9th. The spectacle includes musicians, lion and dragon dances, stunning outfits, acrobats and martial art performers. More than 5,000 people participate in the parade. Celebrate the Year of the Rat. [The Chinese zodiac begins a new 12-year cycle in early 2020 with the Year of the Rat. According to lore, the rat (as a zodiac animal personality, that is) is associated with wealth, cleverness and likability. Those all sound pretty good.]

The New Year Parade

 

Helpful hints
For prime photo and viewing opportunities, get as close to the barricades as you can. Once the crowd forms the lines will be several people deep and movement will be restricted along the path. So find a good spot and stick to it! Remember that spectators count in the thousands, with travelers even coming from outside the city to enjoy the festivities.

You will be outside for the duration of the parade, which lasts for several hours and occurs rain or shine. Even in milder temperatures, being exposed to wind and rain over a prolonged period can be harsh. Avoid bulky bags, which might be searched. And keep your hands free so you can take great pics and set off those fun confetti cannons!
Note; Public bathrooms are rare in this area. I would suggest that you do not load up on liquids before the parade. Columbus Park (mulberry Street) is open but not always the cleanest. If you go into an eating place ask if they have bathrooms for customers before ordering.
Click on pictures to enlarge

In Chinatown is that many things are looking at you.

What to eat

Traditional holiday foods include dumplings, long noodles, peanuts and dim sum to name a few. You’ll find plenty of places along the main Chinatown strips serving up menus filled with New Year’s delicacies. 

Also, You can find fresh fish to take home at a very reasonable price.

 

Many interesting moments when you are just wandering.

Young women mix of the traditional and the modern.

Color is everywhere

 

A few of the “other” photos.

Previous Posts about Chinatown

Chinatown’s Charm

Joss Paper – Funerals

people

Hand Fans

This is a brief video to let you listen to the noise.Video

NYC Easter Bonnet – Easter Parade – Easter Bunny – Easter Eggs

In New York City, the Easter Parade tradition dates back to the mid-1800s, when the upper crust of society would attend Easter services at various Fifth Avenue churches then stroll outside afterward, showing off their new spring outfits and hats. Average citizens started showing up along Fifth Avenue to check out the action.

In 1948, the popular film Easter Parade was released, starring Fred Astaire and Judy Garland and featuring the music of Irving Berlin. The title song includes the lyrics: “In your Easter bonnet, with all the frills upon it/You’ll be the grandest lady in the Easter parade.”

Easter Parade starting at about 10am and continuing until 4pm, the parade marches north on Fifth Avenue, from 49th Street to 57th Street in Manhattan from 10am-4pm on Easter Sunday.  Unlike most New York City Parades, the Easter Parade isn’t an organized event.

It is a time to enjoy decorative chapeaus and the delight of the Easter holiday.

 

When I was growing up my folks always got my brother and me a new suit for Easter.

DO you have any old photos of Easter?

By the early twentieth century, Americans became more and more invested in the Easter outfit—the hat, in particular. Because Easter coincides with seasonal fecundity, women garnered fresh flowers to wear in their hair and in their bonnets. Lilies, daffodils, azaleas with their red, pink or even crème colored blooms, Hyacinths, purple and white, as well as pussy willows and red tulips are considered traditional Easter flowers

 

 

 

Easter Bonnets can be whimsical, fantastical, with a hint of fabulist narrative, whether religious, seasonal or cultural, all adding to the magic of the hat.

 

These days, the Easter Bonnet can be wild, They can also be simple and playful, subtly nodding to the Bonnet’s modern tradition with a bunny ear or two. What will your Easter Bonnet hold?

 

 

 

 

The Easter Bunny – Easter Eggs

 

Have you ever wondered how a rabbit and chocolate eggs became associated with Easter?

The exact origins of the famous bunny are unclear however many sites have stated that it may have come from pre-Christian Germany. The hare was said to be the symbol of the pagan Goddess of Spring and Fertility, Eostre or Ostara. As anyone who is familiar with hares or rabbits will know, they are a great symbol for fertility as they have great ‘stamina’. The festival of Eostre and the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus soon became intertwined and the Christian holiday Easter was born.

The Germans changed the image of the rabbit into Oschter Haws, a rabbit who would lay a nest of coloured eggs for good children on the night before Easter. As the legend and popularity of Oshter Haws spread throughout the States, he soon became the Easter Bunny.

Easter is a religious holiday, but some of its customs, such as Easter eggs, are likely linked to pagan traditions. The egg, an ancient symbol of new life, has been associated with pagan festivals celebrating spring.

Decorating eggs for Easter is a tradition that dates back to at least the 13th century, according to some sources. One explanation for this custom is that eggs were formerly a forbidden food during the Lenten season, so people would paint and decorate them to mark the end of the period of penance and fasting, then eat them on Easter as a celebration.

Did you color eggs for Easter?

 

 

 

 

 

NYC – Backup Plan for Rainy Day

NYC – Rain makes for sudden changes

Recently, I went to see a parade –IMMIGRANT’S PARADE  – but unfortunately when I got there it started to rain. I mean really rain!

Click photos to enlarge

So you are soaking wet and the parade gets cancelled, what to do?

Think inside. Before I went to the parade I looked up where the parade was to be held and also what other sites are nearby. I guess it is called having a backup plan.

The following is a record of my afternoon:

I arrived at the parade and found many participants seeking cover. I walked over by the Radio City Hall and realized that the parade was not going to hap

First, I headed into Rockefeller Center (nice and dry) walked underneath from 6th Avenue to Seventh Avenue. Sat for awhile had a coffee and used their bathroom.

I had read that an old Art Store had been converted into a cooperative for artists and headed in that direction.The cooperative had just opened and had only a few artisans manning their displays.

 

The rain kept coming so I ducked into the Sheraton Hotel . Hotel lobbies are great places to sit and rex and, if needed, use their public bathroom.

Rain continues so I am off to the Time Warner Building at Columbus Circle. Passing the Columbus Circle Subway entrance, I was intrigued by the colorful sign advertising 39 stores below in the subway lobby.

So, below I went Great use of this space and very unique shops and dry.

I decided to head for home.

Moral: No matter what the weather, go and explore!

NYC – Alphabet City – Loisada Festival

Loisada Festival Parade

 

This weekend it was nice to visit the area of Manhattan called Alphabet City. It is different from the center of Manhattan, in the sense that it is more quiet and without the presence of tourists. There is not any major attraction to see, so you can go for a walk and enjoy this characteristic neighborhood.

 

I went to see the annual Loisada Festival Parade, a colorful and fun-filled event. This part of the city in tucked away east of 1st Avenue and south of 14th Street. Some people think it is the last real neighborhood in Manhattan. Low rise buildings, community gardens and funky places to eat or drink.

Well, enough from the Chamber of Commerce, here are some photos of the parade and festival. I have been going to many NYC parades and his one was the most lively and fun. unfortunately, my video was not working but I hope my photos will show you that the participant were most young adults having fun.

 

Preparing for the parade

 

 

 

 

This was a happy group of marchers

 

 

 

A very exciting drum corp

 

Coffee Time.

NYC – Three Kings Parade – Celebration – 2017

 

For four decades El Museo del Barrio has celebrated and promoted the Three Kings Day tradition with an annual parade. This year’s march begins at 106th Street and Lexington Avenue and travels to Third Avenue to end at 115th Street and Park Avenue. The procession features camels, colorful puppets, floats, and thousands of students and other community members as participants.

It is a small event as NYC events go. It is mostly parents of participating children that line the streets. This but one of many activities that make NYC neighborhoods great.

 

and  the cleanup crew…

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NYC – Vegetarian – Vegan Parade

aa   This Blog started out to give you a glimpse of the Vegan/ Vegetarian Parade.

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The parade. this year, due to threatening skies, had fewer participants  and  was smaller than in previous years. Though smaller in number they were never-the-less quite vocal and upbeat.

 

 

The following are some web sites that may be of interest to you. I am not recommending the restaurants as I have not been to many of them.  My interest is to show you that you can eat well in NYC as a vegetarian or vegan. The city has many excellent vegetarian and vegan restaurants, and new ones are opening almost everyday.

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http://www.happycow.net/north_america/usa/new_york/new_york_city/ 

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http://www.businessinsider.com/best-vegan-and-vegetarian-in-nyc-2013-12?op=1 

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Below is not a comprehensive list but does give you some information about restaurants in different parts of the city. (YELP)

http://www.yelp.com/search?cflt=vegan&find_loc=Midtown+West%2C+Manhattan%2C+NY#find_desc&l=p:NY:New_York:Manhattan:[Chelsea,Chinatown,East_Village,Gramercy,Greenwich_Village,Lower_East_Side,Meatpacking_District,Midtown_East,Midtown_West,SoHo,Theater_District,Union_Square,West_Village]

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NYC – Hats – What hat are you wearing?

Honesty up-front… lazy summer days make for feeble attempt to keep blog on track… here is probably a great example of “feeble attempt”.

A hat is a head covering. It can be worn for protection against the elements, for ceremonial or religious reasons, for safety, or as a fashion accessory. In the past, hats were an indicator of social status. In the military, they may denote nationality, branch of service, and/or rank.

I have observed that the type hat is often worn depending on the location. Here are a few locations:

Easter Hats

               

 

Parade Hats

 

Park Hats

          

Street Hats

 The Cat in the Hat (of topic)
One might think that this was about a cat and a hat but Geisel used a list of 348 words that every six-year-old should know, and insisted that the book’s vocabulary be limited to 225 words. The finished book, used 223 words that appeared on the list plus 13 words that did not.
The story is 1629 words in length and uses a vocabulary of only 236 distinct words, of which 54 occur once and 33 twice. Only a single word – another – has three syllables, while 14 have two and the remaining 221 are monosyllabic. The longest words are something and playthings.
In an interview, said that the title for the book came from his desire to have the title rhyme and the first two suitable rhyming words that he could find from the list were “cat” and “hat. So I guess “Hat” was not the inspiration of the story.