NYC – Ghanaian Artists Create Unusual Movie Posters

This past week I spotted a community day [ free day] at the  Poster House-the first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters. The weather turned out to be nice and the event was free, so why not take a look. I thought how great it will be to see posters of movies that maybe I have enjoyed. It would be nice to see the posters that advertised them

The Poster House is just two blocks (west) from the Flatiron Building on east 23rd Street. And is close to Leggo Land, Madison Square Park and  Sony Square.

The Poster House is a small exhibit space with a book-store and coffee shop. There is a fee on non-free days.

BAPTIZED BY BEEFCAKE: THE GOLDEN AGE OF HAND-PAINTED MOVIE POSTERS FROM GHANA Over-the-top posters were a key part of Ghana’s vigorous black market in American VHS tapes in the 1980s and ’90s.

  • These movie posters were all created by artists in Ghana to promote traveling movie shows and sell tickets to bootleg screenings of various western and local movies.
  • These posters range from quirky recreations of the original movies to WTF inducing paintings with imagery completely unrelated to the original content.

While the posters were very interesting, some might say weird, the descriptions were equally interesting and worth reading.

Rambo is stylized like Jesus with long flowing hair and a wound in his side that emulates Christ’s on the cross. The artist has moved the bullet hole to his chest.
This poster uses the box cover as its inspiration but elaborates upon it by removing Arnold’s sunglasses and exposing part of his mental skull Also added a nude couple in the lower register, which could reference the only love scene in he movie. However, neither of them had black hair
The design draws from the official PAL box cover. However ,he has replaced the New York skyline in the lower register with an image of a Eddie Murphy in a coffin – a scene that does not appear in the film
This probably the most overly penticostal film in the exhibition, an exorcism leading to the destruction of the demon world and the salvation of a family
This poster does away with the lead-figures iconic mop and instead adds two semi-naked women at his feet who does not appear in the movie.
 
This design bears no resemblance to any material for the movie. Missing is the lead’s hybrid chainsaw-hand. This is the most complex posters in exhibit.
Box covers typically only show the carriage holding three creatures. The artist has added the knif held by the baby as well as three monsters floating above, all of them appear in movie but never on promotional material

NYC -The National Museum of the American Indian -Lower Manhattan – Free August 2019 update

Located right in the heart of Lower Manhattan steps from the Statue of Liberty Ferry, Wall Street and close to other historic sites

The National Museum of the American Indian

This is one building you cannot miss! One Bowling Green facing Broadway and Trinity Streets. Just a stones throw from the famous “Wall Street Bull”. And, only a short walk from Castle Clinton and the Statue of Liberty boat entrance.

 

The U.S. Custom House is a seven-story structure on the south side of Bowling Green.

 

It has a grand set of stairs facing Bowling Green.

 

New since I originally wrote this the Diker Pavilion for Native Arts and Cultures has been added to the first floor. This a rotating exhibition which, on my visit, was showing the following:

 

On the seconfd floor is the Rotunda, As you enter the interior feels immense but is very simply laid out. There are exhibition located in adjacent galleries.

Around the rotunda there are galleries  house that permanent exhibition and special exhibits
Masterworks from Native cultures highlight the permanent  collection.

The collection of art and artifacts are from a variety of tribes spanning hundreds of years. The individual items selected for showing are outstanding. However, I did not get a sense of history as everything is organized geographically rather than chronologically. While the exhibits are excellent,  they seem a little lost in such  a large building.

 (click photos to enlarge)

 

As I said earlier, I enjoyed the individual artifacts and was glad that I went inside this majestic building.

Hamilton Grange – uptown from the NYC Broadway Stage -Hamilton Heights

Updated  July 2018 – I added additional informaion at the end in case, you would like to explore the area.

hamilton Grange (6)

Nice place to check out if you’re a history buff and you enjoy exploring the lesser explored areas of the city the Hamilton Grange House is an interesting, easy, place to visit. The house and tour are free. They offer a few tours throughout the day and there’s a small self-guided exhibit and video you can see as well. There are only a handful of original pieces in the house. The house is not exactly the way it looked, but you do get a sense of where Hamilton spent some of his last years.

You cannot miss the house as it sits precariously positioned on a hill – It is the third place the building has been moved to

You enter into the basement where the kitchen/servants quarters would have been (obviously the basement is not original to the house) and this takes you into the visitors center/small gift shop where the rangers hang out.

After touring these three rooms you can visit the first floor which has been decorated in period era furnishings.  I say period era because there are only two items in the house which were directly owned by Hamilton.  Everything else is the NPS’s best guess.

Updated on July 30, 2018

While I enjoyed the visit, it may not be for everyone. The area is away from other popular historic sites. the area streets are somewhat steep and can be difficult walking for some. The Grange is a very basic structure and inside there were several replica and period pieces as well as a few original items. To better enjoy your visit,  I suggest adding a walk around City College(immediately above the Grange)  to see the unique buildings and gargoyles. 

I added an article from amNY.com that gives a newer look at this area

Hamilton Heights is full of historic buildings of all types. St. Luke’s’ Episcopal Church, which saved the Grange in 1889, is still here. Hamilton Terrace is an out-of-the way enclave, running one block between West 141st and West 144th and Like Strivers Row and Convent Avenue, it has single-family rowhouses in excellent condition.

Also, it is worth it to walk around the corner to St Luke’s church to see the Alexander Hamilton statue…

For me, I enjoyed my visit to this summer home of Alexander Hamilton. He was a vital part of our nation’s history and it is nice to know that his heritage has been preserved.

 

hamilton Grange (49)

 

 

 Links of Interest:

City College

 Sylvan Terrace

Hamilton Historic District

NYC – a walk in NOHO

A walk through NOHO which is tucked between East Village and Greenwich Village is a small downtown nook with an eclectic sensibility and bohemian spirit. Expansive lofts, chic boutiques, and quaint cafes abide in this tiny yet happening neighborhood.

  • East to West Boundaries: Bowery and Broadway
  • North to South Boundaries: East 8th St. and East Houston St.
  • Nearby Neighborhoods: Greenwich Village, Soho, Nolita, and East Village

The area’s small streets are dissected by three major commercial arteries: Broadway, where many chain stores are found, Lafayette Street, where restaurants mingle with cultural institutions and the buzzing Bowery Street, which houses a cluster of eateries and late-night options.

I began my walk at east Houston and 2nd Avenue, (I could have started nearer my destination but Whole Foods has a public bathroom – ask for the code, and then walked to Crosby St.Heading north to Bleeker St.

I came upon an array of small shops like Village Tannery on Great Jones Street, INA NoHo on Bleecker Street and Louis Purple on Lafayette Street. I rarely shop, so I cannot endorse any of these or the many restaurants along Great Jones Street or Lafayette Street – they all looked great from the outside. I am usually always interested in older buildings, at least those that have not been razed for glass towers. When you gaze upward several gems of NoHo’s visual culture  become visible. –

A white terra-cotta building with 6 supporting  angels

Bond Street was a very fashionable in the 1800’s. Now it has small shops and a few restaurants. One older house is still standing is at #26 was probably owned by a wealthy new yorker.

Great Jones Street is really east 3rd Street

Exaggerated French ornate arch of NYC Fire Department’s Engine Company No. 33 (44 Great Jones St.),

 

Seems to be the rear of a church but there is no front on e 4th st.

 

On east 4th Street is the Old Merchant’s House Museum. One of the oldest houses of this style in NYC. there are a lot original pieces of furniture inside. Also it supposed to haunted as well.

The following is a collection of photos taken along the walk

 

I took a look inside the Papp public Theater which is a very imposing structure. Also, has a public bathroom)

 

 

 

NYC – Barbershop Museum

This past weekend the Barbershop Museum was officially opened. but when I went over to visit  the museum was closed. Unusual for me, I have taken the liberty to copy a few photos  and cite some information from the internet

 

 

Joining the ever-growing list of quirky city museums is the NYC Barber Museum, a newly opened Upper West Side establishment dedicated to the art and history of barbering. The brainchild of Arthur Rubinoff — a fourth-generation “Master Barber” and the CEO of the Reamir  barbershop chain whose star-studded clientele includes Bruce Willis, Tony Danza and Regis Philbin — the museum opened this past Friday with much fanfare. Now it’s paying tribute to generations of old school barbers, while also offering a variety of grooming services to visitors. Best yet, it’s free to visit. They have no telephone listed.

(Source:untapped cities)
This would be a neat place to visit if you are 9 blocks away from Lincoln; 7 blocks away from Zabar’s; a few blocks away from the Beacon Theater; and one block away from Central Park) I would put it on your list of things to see only if in the area

 

The NYC Barber Museum is located at 290 Columbus Ave. It’s open “casual hours” Sat-Mon; Tues 10:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Wed 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Thurs 11 a.m.-11 p.m. and Fri 10 a.m.-7 p.m.

NYC – Lower Manhattan – Louis Vuitton Exhibition -a must see.

Louis Vuitton Exhibition

If you are in the area – Lower Manhattan   —– it is a must see.

Located at 86 Trinity Place and next to the Trinity Church and walking distance from the 9/11 Tribute Museum, Wall Street, The Charging bull Statue to name only a few. Hours open

Yesterday I went to the Lois Vuitton Exhibition –  It was one the best curated shows I have seen this year. It certainly demonstrates how the wealthy traveled but it also leaves you inspired to travel.

It should be no surprise that the show is about the evolution of luggage. Throughout you will see the use of canvas and wood with a very distinctive pattern. There are flat trunks, wardrobe trunks all set within exceptional displays. Did you ever know of so many kinds of trunks?

There is so much to see that I walked through the exhibit twice. I took so many photos that couldn’t decide which ones to put in the blog. I decided to add some to the  end. Also, I decided not to explain each photo – better for you to visit and see each them in context with the display they are set up in.

(Note: click on photos to enlarge)

 

 

One of the rooms was set up like a train car. Here is a video of my walking past the display. Sorry for the quality.

 

 

Extras,  if you are up to it  (Click to enlarge)

B/W Photos

Cases for hairbrushes and cosmetics – sorry for the noise

Odds and Ends

 

A forgotten Garden in Fredericksburg VA – was to be part of The National Slave Museum.

UPDATED WITH 2017 PHOTOS – AT END OF ARTICLE.

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Tucked away in a remote area of Fredericksburg VA is a small garden – The spirit of Freedom – A somewhat forgotten part of what was to be The National Slave Museum.

In 2013, mostly overgrown it is tended to, occasionally, by a young student who has taken the voluntary task of trying to maintain the garden. The National Slave Museum has gone bankrupt and the property will probably become a ball field. I was impressed with the young girls attempt to keep this place alive so I searched and found the garden.

The garden is near several Civil War battlefields where soldiers fought to preserve slavery, In the center of the garden stands a solemn stone figure arms outstretched, face turned skyward as if rejoicing over the broken shackles etched into its thick arms….The Hallelujah Sculpture, a 5,000 pound statue,” according to museum officials, “represents the pain, tears, and un-timely deaths of those millions who never gave up on their belief that one day they would be free.”

As interesting as the statue is, I found, at the rear of the garden, an amazing discovery. There were several tree trunks with beautifully carved designs of slaves in various positions. Here is a brief slide show.

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The remainder of the garden:

 

UPDATE: October 2017

After three years, I had a chance to re-visit the site. You can see through the following photos that, while you can still see a few of the remains, the site is almost fully forgotten history

NYC -The National Museum of the American Indian -Lower Manhattan – Free

The National Museum of the American Indian

This is one building you can’t miss! One Bowling Green facing Broadway and Trinity Streets. Just a stones throw from the famous “Wall Street Bull”. And, only a short walk from Castle Clinton and the Statue of Liberty boat entrance.

 

 

 

The U.S. Custom House is a seven-story structure on the south side of Bowling Green.

 

It has a grand set of stairs facing Bowling Green.

 

 

 

Everything seems huge and as you enter the interior feels immense but is very simply laid out with a spectacular rotunda.

The second floor gallery houses the permanent exhibition other floors were not open. Masterworks from Native cultures highlight the collections. If you are at Battery Park it may be worth a visit. This is Part Two – Part One – here

The collection of art and artifacts are from a variety of tribes spanning hundreds of years. The individual items selected for showing are outstanding. However, I did not get a sense of history as everything is organized geographically rather than chronologically. While the exhibits are excellent,  they seem a little lost in such  a large building.

 (click photos to enlarge)

 

As I said earlier, I enjoyed the individual artifacts and was glad that I went inside this majestic building.

NYC – Madison Avenue – South? Native Fashion Now comes to Lower Manhattan

Part One

Lower Manhattan on a bright sunny day… hot, humid and in need of “coolness”. What better way to escape but to visit the  NYC Museum of the American Indian.

The museum  is located in the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House at One Bowling Green in New York City. ( more on this on next blog.) Free admission too!

During this visit they had on display an exhibition “Native Fashion Now” Nearly 70 works spanning the last 50 years Native fashion designers and artists from style-makers to maverick designers. The show emphasizes fashion and creativity in Native culture. I share a few photos from this exhibit. I will share in the next blog some of the interesting exhibits in  other parts of the building..

Part two will cover the building history as well as the other exhibits.

 

 

 

 

“Native Fashion Now” is on view through September 4, 2017.

NYC – The Explorers Club -worth a visit

 

The Explorers Club

Walking to Central Park along  east 70th Street.  I was intrigued by the façade of a building that looked like it was Elizabethan England. I Crossed the street to have a better look and peered through the heavy metal door. Inside, it looked like a private club all wood and leather chairs. Also there were all kinds of interesting items hanging from the walls. Of course it didn’t dawn on me to look at the nameplate on the door before looking – The Explorers Club.

 

 

I hesitated a moment and then opened the door and was met by a very friendly receptionist. I asked if the club was open to the public and she said it was a private club but that I could visit the  first two floors. What a treat, I was about to become a faux explorer for a few hours!

 

 

What is the Explorer’s Club?

Founded in New York City in 1904,  the private Explorers Club promotes the scientific exploration of land, sea, ai, and space by supporting research and education in the physical, natural and biological sciences. The Club’s members have been responsible for an illustrious series of famous firsts: First to the North Pole, first to the South Pole, first to the summit of Mount Everest, first to the deepest point in the ocean, first to the surface of the moon—all accomplished by members. Members must have participated in some form of scientific exploration. The club is filed with souvenirs you won’t find anywhere else, such as an Explorers Club Flag Carried on the moon, a taxidermied Siberian polar bear and a ship’s bell from Admiral Byrd’s expedition.

Upon entering, I had the feeling that I was entering an old estate in England… Tudor. Jacobean and wood everywhere!

 

Members Lounge

First floor foyer

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Second Floor

The Clark room is the largest in the building where the walls are covered with noteworthy flags. One of these flags is taken to the Gobi Desert by paleontologist Roy Andrews. – I mention this because he was the inspiration for the movie “Indians Jones”.

 

 

The Library Room

 

 

There are still four more floors but they are not open to the public.

Als0, one block awayfrom Central Park and the Frick Museum.