Forgotten or Lost? WW1 Memorial

Today a group of people who visited a world War I Memorial in Central Park published a post in a local blog. It was a visit to the WWI 307th Infantry Regiment Memorial Grove.

I must confess having explored Central Park, for several years, this was new to me. The memorial is in a grove dedicated to the  WWI 307th Infantry Regiment.

The Grove is an area of Central Park located just south of the Band Shell, surrounded on all four sides by paved walkways.

The area of the Grove originally was covered with grass, consistent with the adjacent areas of the park. However, a number of years ago, the grass was replaced with wood chips, apparently as a result of soil erosion and insufficient sunlight below the tall tree canopy.

The Regiment participated in the following campaigns: Oise-Aisne, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne, and Lorraine. Company K was a member of the “Lost Battalion“.

The lost battalion — outnumbered, outmaneuvered and outguessed — was cut off from other American forces along the Western Front. It was also hit by friendly fire and stunned by German flamethrowers. A captain was so badly wounded he leaned on rifles as crutches as he continued to give orders to the single surviving machine-gunner. The casualties were almost unfathomable: By the time reinforcements finally arrived, 107 soldiers had been killed, 190 were wounded and 63 were missing. Little more than a third of the unit, 194 of the original 554 soldiers, escaped unhurt.

After the war, young trees were planted in the grove—each representing one of the regiment’s companies—which features a memorial plaque naming the men of that company who died in battle. One of those plaques specifically honors the fallen members of Company H, 307th Infantry Regiment, including baseball great CPT Edward (“Eddie”) L. Grant.

The Grove also contains the 307th Infantry Regiment Stone, with its plaque honoring all companies, and the Knights of Pythias Stone.



Thanks to the group for sharing…

I later noticed that there had been a movie made about the Lost Battalion.

Veterans Day – 2020

First posted 2019

Many of us who live in New York City, as well as those who visit, may not get the chance to visit many of our public parks. I came across this article from the NYC Parks Department and wondered how many other comminities have memorials, to veterans, that are rarely visited.

5 of the Places in Parks that Honor Our Veterans

There are hundreds of memorials honoring the nation’s veterans spread throughout the city’s parks. Here are a few of the memorials we encourage you to visit to pay respect to our soldiers.

Visit our War Memorials in Parks page to find out more about the monuments near you and the battles they commemorate. 

Brooklyn War Memorial

Cadman Plaza, Brooklyn

Brooklyn War Memorial, source: Wikicommons, Ingfbruno.

source: Wikicommons, Ingfbruno.

This granite and limestone memorial is dedicated to the more than 300,000 heroic men and women of the borough of Brooklyn who served in World War II. Inside are displayed approximately 11,500 names of Brooklyn service members who died during the war.

Learn more about Brooklyn War Memorial

Van Cortlandt Memorial Grove

Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx

Van Cortlandt Memorial Grove

The Memorial Grove honors local servicemen who fought in World War II, local soldiers who served and lost their lives in the Korean War, and those from the community who served in the Vietnam War. A variety of oak trees (a symbol of strength and endurance) were planted to provide shade and create a tranquil area for reflective contemplation. Bronze plaques dedicated to twenty-one soldiers were placed beneath each newly planted tree. In addition, plaques to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and to the sons of the American Gold Star Mothers were also dedicated.

Learn more about Van Cortlandt Memorial Grove

East Coast Memorial

Battery Park, Manhattan

East Coast Memorial

This awe-inspiring monument consists of an eagle gazing past eight 19-foot tall granite pylons on which are inscribed the names of the 4,601 American servicemen who died in the Atlantic Ocean during World War II.

Learn more about East Coast Memorial

Korean War Veterans Memorial

Kissena Park, Queens

Korean War Veterans Memorial

The memorial plaza and sculpture honors the forgotten heroes of the Korean War. The bronze sculpture by artist William Crozier consists of a larger-than-life solitary soldier. On a smaller scale behind him are the silhouettes of five soldiers carrying a stretcher and scaling the dangerous mountain terrain of Korea. The plaza surrounding the memorial has two types of granite paving stones that are laid in an asymmetric pattern symbolic of the rice fields of Korea. Prairie grass, which is native across the U.S., grows at the base of the sculpture and represents the soldier’s return home.

Learn more about Korean War Veterans Memorial

The Hiker

Tompkinsville Park, Staten Island

The Hiker

This statue honors the local soldiers who served in the Spanish-American War. Depicting a foot soldier dressed in military fatigues, with a rifle slung over his shoulder, the image is derived from the long marches that the infantry endured in the tropical Cuban climate.

Learn more about The Hiker