Elizabeth Street (Little Italy) – delightful garden

Updated from 2015

There is a small park – Elizabeth Street Gardens – on Elizabeth Street , between Prince & Spring streets (Little Italy) that is very unusual. While not open all the time it is a great place to have lunch (bring your own) or picnic or sit in the shade. You will be surrounded by statuary of all kinds. Oh by the way, it is free. Check here for when open.

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The Elizabeth Street Gallery, open to the public in a park like setting, contains a variety of ornamental stonework, some of it depicting mythological figures

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I walked the length of Elizabeth Street and found most of the people enjoying the day. The restaurants were busy and  those stores that were open had customers.

Most of the buildings in the area are multifamily, or apartment buildings dating from the first decade or two of the 20th Century

Some people think that the boundary between Chinatown and SOHOis mid-block between Kenmare and Spring,  The area to the south is mostly Chinese.

Before  the virus arrived the northern area was home to upscale galleries and shops north of Kenmare.

As of this date,  many shops have closed due to the pandemic. The street is filled mostly with outside dining. and there is a lot of construction going on. However, visiting the garden is still very enjoyable and all along the street people were animated and enjoying their visit. Most wearing masks and other than restaurants and bars, keeping some separation between each other

I am confident that after we solve the health situation  These  two blocks just South of Houston will, again, become quite alive and quite trendy.

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Carved, painted and lettered shingle signs that hang over the sidewalk are becoming popular in the neighborhoods where the hip people go,
 Photos taken on November 8, 2020

Trivia

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Elizabeth and Hester may be the only intersection in Manhattan where both streets are women’s first names, though Hester isn’t used much anymore. Elizabeth Street is one of the few major streets in Manhattan that begins and ends at a T-shaped intersection.

NYC – enjoy a private art gallery

NYC – enjoy a private art gallery

 

NYC offers you an opportunity to visit many famous museums. Often though, you may find some of best art there the “other” place might be appreciating works of art in a private gallery.

Sometimes it is great to imagine yourself   a person of means. Walking  around  the city, you can’t help but encounter shops that sell high-end goods.  It is  fun to go inside to enjoy seeing items that, I am sure,  cannot be seen anywhere else..

Today I entered the world of high-end art – The  Bartoux gallery – Central Park South and 7th Avenue. The gallery is quite impressive with large street windows and a deep interior with walls covered with brightly colored art. The staff was very friendly ad welcomed me and allowed me to take photos. You will find that most galleries welcome visitors and are most cordial in answering questions.

 

The gallery host art from leading artists (partial list)

MARC CHAGALL    ANDY WARHOL   BRUNO CATALANO   JULIEN MARINETTI   NOE TWO   DAMIEN hIRST

Welcome to a sample of what is inside

 

 

Damien Hirst

 

 

Noe Two – The Last Hope Spray paint and acrylic on cnvas

 

 

 

Julien Marinetti is a sculptor and engraver. All of these animals are bronze and painted with lively colors.

NYC – More than Tourist Sites – Street Fairs and Festivals

 

I happened to be going through the upper east side and stopped at a street fair on East 116th Street. It had children rides, not often seen in the city, as well as food and some novelty items for sale.I was reminded that over the past few years I have written about street fairs. Here are links to my past articles. I hope they encourage you, while visiting NYC, to get out an enjoy at least one street experience.

 

NYC- Summer – Food, Faces and Fairs – Faces and Food

NYC – Street Fairs – Information -Memo –  Where to find street fairs

NYC – What do you like about Street Fairs? – Mostly pics of food

NYC – Enjoy a NYC Street Festival – Ukraine Festival. Links festival  to info sites

NYC – UnFair Art Show – Example of Pop=Up fairs

OMG – another NYC Street Fair? – Challenge

New York City – Street Fair – Saturday and Sunday best days

NYC — small Art Galleries worth visiting

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This is a follow-up from a previous post Fall in Central Park –Metropolitan Museum Area

Today, I visited three very small art galleries just a half-block from 5th Avenue on east 79th Street. While they might not be your primary destination, I am confident it will add to your NYC experience.

 

Let’s get our bearings. Just north of east 79th Street is the Metropolitan Museum. To the south is the Frick Museum and at the corner of  East 79 and 5th Avenue is the Ukrainian Institute. If you are in Central Park, then you might be at the Obelisk or the area around the Belvedere Castle/Turtle Pond.

 Each gallery is in a brownstone and their spaces are small but very tranquil.  I’ve found the staff at each  gallery to be pleasant. You are left to enjoy the art works at your own pace. If you are interested in a studying different themes of art and seeing the modernism,  abstract and deciphering themes of art.  Each gallery is free and they do change their themes during the year.

NYC note: Most New York City galleries enjoy having people come in and look at their art. Often though, you may feel a little intimidated but I walk up those few steps and later you will come down with a smile and the satisfaction that you went inside. 

I have placed a sampling from each gallery below. I, purposely,did not identify the gallery each came from, I would like you to consider them as a combined example for your visit.

Skarstedt Gallery

20 East 79th St.

Acquavella Galleries

18 E 79th St.

Rosenfeld Gallery

16 E 79th St.

Note: There is a coffee shop at the corner of East 79th Street and Madison Avenue. Also, around the corner are more places to eat. Best to use the Park bathrooms before venturing out as bathrooms are scarce in this area. However, if really needed, you can use the bathroom in the New York  Society Library – 53 East 79th St just on the next block.

Also, along with several galleries on the upper east side, there are many small galleries throughout the city – don’t be bashful!

 

NYC – Wild Things – Maurice Sendak – Sothebys – Free

 

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Max arriving at the Island

Wild Things

The Art of Maurice Sendak

 

Sothebys has on exhibition  preliminary and finished drawings, artwork for posters, theatrical sets and costumes, and more from Maurice Sendak.  His  world recreated at the gallery  is at once playful, inventive, subversive, and, above all, wild.

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Transformation

A Brief Author Bio

Maurice Sendak (1928-2012), author of many beloved works including Where the Wild Things Are (1963) and In the Night Kitchen (1970), has captivated our imaginations for decades by creating immersive and distinctive literary worlds. The exhibition is open through December 18, 2015.

 

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Moishe and Bernard

 

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New York is Book Country

 

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Watercolor for JewishBook Monthly

 

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IBBY Congress 1990

 

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Wild Thing Eyes
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A Tabletop Cow (Moo-Reese

 

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Love for Three Oranges – Armchair

A closing thought: Many of the places I visit may not your “cup-of-tea”.

My blog is just reminding  us to enjoy what is around us.

What is in your neighborhood ?

NYC – New York City Questions – New-York Historical Society

ny historicAL QUESTION

Here is some trivia from the New – York Historical Society. They might come in handy at your next family gathering or for use during a long trip.

 

Questions about New York City

  1. How Much Horse Manure Was Deposited on the Streets of New York City Before the Advent of the Automobile, and What Happened to It?
  2. Are There More Statues of Liberty Than the One That Stands in New York Harbor?
  3. How Did the New York Yankees Get Their Name?
  4. How Did the Boroughs Get Their Names?
  5. What is the Oldest Building in New York City?
  6. How Did New York Get Its Famous Nickname: The Empire State?

 

 

ANSWERS

1. How Much Horse Manure Was Deposited on the Streets of New York City Before the Advent of the Automobile, and What Happened to It?

According to the 89th Annual Report of the Board of Health, nearly 500 tones of horse manure were collected from the streets of New York every day, produced by 62,208 horses living in 1,307 stables. The manure, along with human waste, was deposited on Barren Island, where it was converted into fertilizer in a process said to be “not inoffensive” to residents on the Long Island shore.

2. Are There More Statues of Liberty Than the One That Stands in New York Harbor?

There are two Statues of Liberty in New York City. One stands i new York Harbor. A replica of “Lady Liberty” has graced the Brooklyn Museum’s Sculpture Garden since 2002. She is thirty feet tall and was commissioned by William H. Flattau in 1900 to stand atop his building, the Liberty Warehouse in Manhattan. Other Statues of Liberty are found throughout the world, including two in Paris, France.

 

3. How Did the New York Yankees Get Their Name?

No definitive answers exists, but there is speculation that it borrows from the Civil War connotaion of the term “Yankee,” in that the team played north of their counterparts, the New York Giants. The Yankees’ other early nicknames, Hilltoppers and Highlanders, similarly drew upon geographic inspiration, but from the location of the team’s first field, Hilltop Park, in Washington Heights.

 

4. How Did the Boroughs Get Their Names?

In 1609 Robert Guet called the island “Mannahata,” after Native American names for the area. Henry Hudson referred to Staten Eylandt after the States General—Netherlands’ governing body. The Bronx is named after Jonas Bronck, who settled in the area in 1639. Brooklyn refers to Breukelen, the Dutch village in the Netherlands. Queens was named after Queen Catherine of Braganza, wife of King Charles II of England (1630-1685).

 

5. What is the Oldest Building in New York City?

The Wyckoff Farmhouse Museum, at 5816 Clarendon Road, Brooklyn, is the city’s oldest surviving stucture. Built in stages beginning around 1652, it housed descendants of Pieter Claesen Wyckoff until 1901, when they sold the property. Repurchased by the Wyckoff Family Association in 1961, it was the first building granted protection by the newly-formed Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1965.

 

6. How Did New York Get Its Famous Nickname: The Empire State?

Signs commonly point to George Washington. Although other, unsubstantiated stories crediting Washington exist, the best documented source is a 1785 thank-you letter to the New York Common Council for bestowing upon him the Freedom of the City. In addition to praising New York’s resilience in the war he describes the State of New York as “the Seat of the Empire.”

 

 

These and many more questions are on A New-York Historical Society Museum web page . More questions are here.

Their current exhibitions are here.

 

 

NYC – Expensive Dollhouse is an extra treat for Thanksgiving…

 

I came across this article about a unique opportunity to see an expensive dollhouse. I reprint here for you to enjoy.

The following is By Diane Pham,  written on Tue, November 3, 2015

 

The World’s Most Expensive Dollhouse Will Be On Show at Columbus Circle This Month – During Thanksgiving Season.

By Diane Pham, Tue, November 3, 2015

the world's most expensive dollhouse, The Astolat Dollhouse Castle, Elaine Diehl

If you think Manhattan condos are pricey, feast your eyes on the world’s most expensive dollhouse! Valued at $8.5 million, The Astolat Dollhouse Castle is a 29-room micro-mansion that’s been is filled to the brim with 10,000 painstakingly crafted miniatures that include “elaborate furniture, oil paintings, mirrors, fireplaces, gold miniature jewelry, rare-mini books more than 100 years old, fine rugs, fabrics, and pieces made of and silver and gold.” Sound too absurd to be true? Well, you can check out this pricey and petite pad up close and personal starting this month. The Shops of Columbus Circle at Time Warner Center (TWC) will be showing the dollhouse for the first time ever since it was built in the 1980s.

Full story and photos FIND OUT MORE HERE

 The Time Warner Building is at Columbus Circle – Macy’s parade  goes through the circle.

NYC -East 70’s – a quick look at fashion and food along the Avenues

 

 

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Many people explore the city by walking near a major tourist attraction, but try venturing a little further away . You may find a greater mix of stores and restaurants that may be more interesting and affordable.

Lately, I took a walk from Lexington Avenue along East 73rd Street heading towards the East River. I did enjoy strolling along the quaint tree-lined blocks, checking out historic townhouses and I ventured up and down the adjacent Avenues to see some  stores and restaurants that are less than a block away from 73rd Street.

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Part of my door series

 

This blog has mostly store windows (fashion) and one interesting Persian Restaurant. However, in my enjoyment of the walk, I forgot to note where I took many of them.

 

I peeked into this little Persian Restaurant only to find that I was too early for lunch.

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2nd Avenue and 73rd Street

 

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Long and narrow

 

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Well, the adventure is in getting out and finding the world around us…

so enjoy and  happy walking!

A little background of the East 70’s area

  • This portion of the Upper East Side is home to schools like the Hewitt School, P.S. 158, P.S. 267, Eleanor Roosevelt High School along with Marymount Manhattan College and the Allen-Stevenson School.
  • Much of the old architecture in this part of the Upper East Side is Neo-Renaissance and French neoclassical. Historic, luxurious mansions like the Henry T. Sloane House at 9 E. 72nd St. and the Edward C. Converse Mansion at 3 E. 78th St.
  • The Henry Clay Frick mansion at 1 E. 70th St. now serves as a museum displaying Fricks art collection.
  • Central Park is just to the west.

 

NYC- Summer – Food, Faces and Fairs

The “outdoor” season has begun. Weekends in NYC  come alive with street fairs and festivals. A visit to one of them could be fun to add to your visit.

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Food is always a good reason for strolling down a street fair.

People looking can be fun but look carefully at the many other faces too.

What is a street fair?

Ans: A shopping mall with a food court and plenty of color. Also, it’s outside!

 

 

 

NYC – Enjoy a NYC Street Festival

Part of a NYC experience should include either a Street Fair or Festival (links at end of article). The month of May usually begins  the season and it continues throughout the summer and early fall.  The Festivals are quite colorful as they showcase music as well as performers. Of course, each festival will have  the street lined with booths selling everything from clothing, folk art and food.

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This past weekend I visited the Ukraine… actually the 39th Annual St. George  Ukrainian Festival, on 7th Street between Second and Third Avenues. The festival    celebrates the traditions of a culture that was once the largest demographic in the  East Village.

 

 

 

This is a small event just one block long but it packed with all kinds of activities. Many of the children were in native costumes.IMG_8768

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Most ethnic festivals are full of color and thing to buy, the Urkainian Festival was no exception

Almost every Festival has a stage and they present entertainment specific to their culture.

                                 (First time trying a video)    click here    Video clip

 

Here are some links to information about Street Fairs and Festivals

 

http://www.newyorkled.com/nyc_events_street_fairs.htm

http://movingsidewalkblog.com/?page_id=144

http://www.events12.com/newyork/may/

http://socialeyesnyc.com/manhattan/

and a tip from Laura C.

http://www.thrillist.com/events/new-york/things-to-do-in-nyc-this-summer-festival-calendar-2015

 

 

Click here for bus and subway info)

 

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