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A forgotten Garden in Fredericksburg VA – was to be part of The National Slave Museum.

UPDATED WITH 2017 PHOTOS – AT END OF ARTICLE.

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Tucked away in a remote area of Fredericksburg VA is a small garden – The spirit of Freedom – A somewhat forgotten part of what was to be The National Slave Museum.

In 2013, mostly overgrown it is tended to, occasionally, by a young student who has taken the voluntary task of trying to maintain the garden. The National Slave Museum has gone bankrupt and the property will probably become a ball field. I was impressed with the young girls attempt to keep this place alive so I searched and found the garden.

The garden is near several Civil War battlefields where soldiers fought to preserve slavery, In the center of the garden stands a solemn stone figure arms outstretched, face turned skyward as if rejoicing over the broken shackles etched into its thick arms….The Hallelujah Sculpture, a 5,000 pound statue,” according to museum officials, “represents the pain, tears, and un-timely deaths of those millions who never gave up on their belief that one day they would be free.”

As interesting as the statue is, I found, at the rear of the garden, an amazing discovery. There were several tree trunks with beautifully carved designs of slaves in various positions. Here is a brief slide show.

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The remainder of the garden:

 

UPDATE: October 2017

After three years, I had a chance to re-visit the site. You can see through the following photos that, while you can still see a few of the remains, the site is almost fully forgotten history

7 comments on “A forgotten Garden in Fredericksburg VA – was to be part of The National Slave Museum.

  1. Wonder pictures and story

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  2. How can a historic site such as this be left overgrown and forgotten – it’s a sin.

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  3. Where is the site? I live in fredericksburg and would like to see what I can

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  4. […] is a follow-up of my previous post Forgotten Garden I wrote about the National Slave Museum […]

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