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nyc – 26 homes over 100 years old – West Village & St Mark’s

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Part of a series -26 houses

  • Much of the following was posted by
  • http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/05/23/hop_on_a_citi_bike_and_visit_26_historic_downtown_buildings.php
  • They selected 26 buildings that are more than 100 years old and located south of 14th Street. (map at end)
  • This was done as a bike tour. If you are brave then rent a bike and follow their guidelines.
  • If you prefer to walk, then the following may be helpful:
  • The walks that I am suggesting are not inclusive.
  • I am highlighting the locations surrounding these buildings but be cautioned there is much more to see and do than described here.
  • Also, don’t walk in straight lines, get a map, start wandering around the adjoining streets.
  • Remember that these walks are to be an adventure not a follow the dots tour.

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West Village  – METRO: Christopher St

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Northern Dispensary (1)
1827. This Georgian triangular structure is the only building in New York, or perhaps anywhere, with one side on two streets (Grove and Christopher) and two sides on one street (Waverly Place). Edgar Allen Poe was once treated here.
165 Waverly Place, New York, NY 10014. If you pass it, look into the Christopher Street park.
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Narrowest House In New York (7) –
1873. Both writer Edna St. Vincent Millay and anthropologist Margaret Mead lived here. It’s less than 10 feet wide on the exterior.
This area has a lot of interesting housing and an old “speakeasy” as well as an original wooden house.
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The Archive (8)
Willoughby J. Edbrooke, William Martin Aiken, James Knox, 1899. Completely out of scale with the West Village of today, the red brick archival building’s great arches and massive piers at street level “show the heavy masonry required to support tall buildings before the steel skeleton came into general use.”
666 Greenwich St, New York, NY 10014
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Past Blogs:
.You could walk around this area maybe down to Bleeker Street, then walk through the Village to Washington Square.
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Judson Memorial Church (6) – If you are doing the Village then this is near Washington  Square.
McKim, Mead, and White, 1892. Baptist Pastor Edward Judson began a campaign in the late 19th century to build “the most beautiful churches among the homes of the poor, so that it would be only a step from the squalor of the tenement houses.” John D. Rockefeller Sr. donated the money for the church to be built and Judson named it after his father, a Protestant missionary. Architectural firm Stanford, Mead, and White described their design as, “Romanesque, strongly influenced by early basilica.” John La Farge designed stained glass windows which are still in the church.
55 Washington Sq S, New York, NY 10012
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This building may not be worth seeing unless you are in the area for another reason. It is just south of Union Square.

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The Lockwood DeForest House (2)
Van Campen Taylor, 1887. Teak-encrusted townhouse built by a teak manufacturer. On one of the most picturesque residential blocks in Greenwich Village. Next door to home of Village writer Dawn Powell. In 1900 a writer for House Beautiful called it the “most beautiful Indian House in America.”
7 East 10th Street, New York, NY 10003
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Metro: Union Square or Astor Place

Past Blogs

East Village #1

East Village #2

Lower East Side- Fodor

St. Mark’s Square

The next  buildings are probably best to see together as they are on the east side. This part of  he lower east-side is funky. St Marks place is on 9th Street. Astor Place has a B&N, K-Mart and is close to Broadway shops.

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128 East 13th Street – (3)
Jardine, Kent, and Jardine, 1903. New York’s last surviving horse and carriage auction mart building, used as an assembly line training facility for women during WWII, and later used as a studio by artist Frank Stella for several decades. Saved from destruction by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation in 2006.
128 East 13th Street, New York, NY 10003
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Webster Hall (4)
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Charles Rentz, 1886. Three-story ballroom and concert hall, made of Philadelphia Brick with stone accents and unglazed red terra-cotta. Adorned with fluted bracketed cornice and decorative terra-cotta panels.
125 E 11th St, New York, NY 10003
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If you haven’t been to this area then I would suggest that you might want to go east on St Mark’s to Avenue A.
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The Cooper Union (5)  Lincoln spoke here and famous beer and Ale tavern is on 7th Street – McSmorley’s. Ukrainian area as well.
Frederick A. Peterson, 1859. The muscular neo-Romanesque shell of Cooper Union is the oldest standing steel framed building in America. Peter Cooper envisioned the elevator as the interior transportation of the future and installed a cylindrical shaft in Cooper Union (before the elevator was actually invented!). But for more than 100 years a box-shaped cab ran in Cooper’s shaft, a square peg in a round hole.
41 Cooper Sq, New York, NY 10003
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If you are thinking of walking west 2nd Street to  Bleeker st. then you might pass this one.
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Bayard-Condict Building (9) – Maybe if you are walking down Eat Houston Street. It is near the Marble-Cemetery.
Louis Sullivan, 1898. The only New York building by Louis Sullivan, father of the skyscraper. Vertical! Steel! Organic bas relief on the facade!
67 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 10012
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Ok time to call it a day… wherever you end up, start thinking of how to get back. Metro Map or Bus.
Additional house  in next edition of 26 houses.
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This one is near the end of 2nd Avenue- maybe worth it????
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Russian Orthodox Cathedral of the Holy Virgin Protection (10)
1891. This stunner of a church was built in the Gothic Revival style by architect J.C. Cady (the same guy who designed the American Museum of Natural History’s south addition). The facade is made from Kentucky limestone, and it has beautifully carved stained glass windows.
59 E 2nd St, New York, NY 10003
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Map rom web site:
26 house map 2
Additional homes coming soon

One comment on “nyc – 26 homes over 100 years old – West Village & St Mark’s

  1. The narrowest House In New York?! Jotting down addresses, now. What a great tour, Thom! I also love your tips. Thank you! T. (Is the speak easy still open? Does it have a name or an address? Interesting! The Lockwood DeForest House is also a beauty!)

    Like

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