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NYC – City College

The Upper – Upper West Side #1

Most visitors to NYC do not think about the upper parts of Manhattan. There are some very interesting and unique places to visit from west 116th street up to west 174th street. Many of these locations are destination places and are on subway or bus routes. They are safe if you stay within the general area of each location.  Unless going to a specific event, visits should be limited to daylight hours

Columbia College                           Highbridge park                Riverside park                Sylvan Court

Morris- Jamal Mansion                  Hispanic society Museum     St John’s cathedral      

Riverside Church

Grant’s Tomb

             

City College of New York City

The City College of New York was originally located at 23rd Street and Lexington Avenue in Manhattan. In 1907 the College moved to its present location on St. Nicholas Heights in Northern Manhattan. The campus occupies 35 acres along Convent Avenue from 131st Street to 141st Street.

 When I first saw these buildings I thought that I was in England. They  were so  very different than anything I had seen in NYC.   They are superb examples of English Perpendicular Gothic style and are among the first buildings, as an entire campus, to be built-in the U.S. in this style.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Groundbreaking for the Gothic Quadrangle buildings took place in 1903. Five of the buildings opened in 1908. The sixth, Goethals Hall, was completed in 1930. The buildings feature 600 grotesques custom designed to represent the practical and the fine arts.

 

 

 

 

The North Campus Quadrangle also includes four great arches on the main avenues leading to the campus: the Hudson Gate on Amsterdam Avenue, the George Washington Gate at 138th Street and Convent Avenue, the Alexander Hamilton Gate at the northern edge of Convent Avenue and the Peter Stuyvesant Gate at St. Nicholas Terrace.

 

The campus is located high on a hill overlooking the east of New York City. Its mascot is the Beaver

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